Category Archives: Media appearances

Planning for your adult child's return home

My advice was featured today in EverythingZoomer.com’s Boomerangst column, which dealt with a family whose adult son is contemplating a move home after several months of unemployment:

“It’s tempting to think that everything’s going to go really smoothly, but that rarely happens by itself,” says Christina Newberry, founder of the website adultchildrenlivingathome.com and the author of The Hands-on Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home.

You can read the rest of the article, including my advice about two documents every family should put together before adult kids move home, here.

Is it harder for young adults to find jobs than it was a decade ago?

Yesterday, I was a guest on CBC Radio’s national Cross Country Checkup program, which tackled the issue of whether it’s harder for young adults to find jobs than it was a decade ago – and what that means in terms of getting them launched into independence. It was an interesting program, and I found myself wishing I could jump in at many parts of the show, not just in the segment in which I was interviewed.

To the mom who said she was anticipating one of her three kids was likely to boomerang home because 26% of young adults do so, I wanted to say she might want to prepare for two of them: In Canada, the actual number of young people aged 20-29 living at home according to the most recent census is 42.3%. (It varies across the country, of course. In Toronto, which has the most adult children living at home, the number is actually 56.3%)

I had a great twitter interaction with Sumaiya Ahmed, who took some ribbing from guest host Suhana Meharchand for suggesting parents should help their adult children network to find a job. It turns out we agree that parents can be a positive force in their children’s job search, but that it’s also possible to take that help too far.

I wanted to talk to some of the young people who called in saying that it was just too hard to find work that was fulfilling, and that they were giving up high-paying jobs (and expecting financial help from their parents) to pursue opportunities that better aligned with their dreams. I wanted to tell them that pursing your dreams is certainly a worthwhile endeavor, but that in your thirties it’s not your parents job to pay for it (it can be financially challenging for them, too), and sometimes your job will simply not be the source of your life’s fulfilment. Certainly the jobs you have to take on to build experience in the early stages of your career are likely to be less than you’d dreamed. But you need to build experience and gain skills that provide value to an employer before you have the bargaining power to craft your dream career.

All of that to say that if you missed the show, you can listen to it here. My segment begins at about 1:16:00.

Today's CBC Radio Cross Country Checkup is all about adult kids living at home

This afternoon’s Cross Country Checkup call-in show tackles the issue of adult children living at home — and whether it’s harder for young people today to find a job. The show airs 4-6 p.m. Eastern time (1-3 Pacific). I’ll be on in the second hour of the program. You can find more information about the show and get the phone number to call in here.

The Nest that Doesn't Empty: Article in the Deseret News

“People make a lot of assumptions about how it’s going to work, and expectations can lead to a lot of challenges, especially if the children have a different perception of what staying at home is going to be like,” said Christina Newberry, Vancouver, Canada, author of “The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home.”

“Parents may be focused on trying to get the children out of the house and the children may not be aware of that. Once you’re an adult, the goal is to get out of your parents’ home. So the conversation is why you’re at home and the steps needed to achieve independence. You should also discuss expectations in terms of how to behave when at home.”

Read the rest in the Deseret News.

A chat with Claudia Lonow, creator of "How to Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life)"

Yesterday, I got to chat with Claufia Lonow, creator of “How to Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life),” a new ABC series starring Sarah Chalke, Elizabeth Perkins, and Brad Garrett. We were on HuffPost Live together, and it was great to have a chance to hear about her really positive experience living with her parents. (The short version: She has lived with them for about 18 years and has no plans to move out — but several years ago they all bought a house together, so she’s certainly paying her own way.)

Here are a couple of shots from the show.

HuffPo2-1

HuffP02-2(with Claudia and host Nancy Redd)

If you missed the segment, you can watch it anytime here.

Shots from my appearance on CTV

Last week, I was a guest on CTV News Network’s Pattie Lovett-Reid Show (a nation-wide Canadian broadcast). Pattie and I talked about how parents can help adult kids achieve financial independence and avoid become the dreaded Bank of Mom and Dad… forever! Here are a couple of shots of my appearance on the show.

Christina Newberry on the Pattie Lovett-Reid Show

Christina Newberry on the Pattie Lovett-Reid Show

The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home by Christina Newberry

There’s been a flurry of media attention today for my book, The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home (by Christina Newberry), so I thought I would add a quick post with some details about the book. It’s packed with great information for families with adult children living at home or planning to move home. It’s available in an eBook format that you can read on your computer, iPad, or other device at www.adultchildrenlivingathome.com. If you prefer a hard copy book that you can put on your bookshelf, you can buy a copy though book supplier createspace here. The book includes a couple of key documents all families need when adult children move home: a family budget template and calculator, and a family contract template. Here’s all the key info:

The Hands-On GuiThe Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home by Christina Newberryde to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home by Christina Newberry
Second Edition published June 2012 by Nuru Guides
Available at www.adultchildrenlivingathome.com

 

 

 

Thanks for your interest!

Signature of Christina Newberry, author of The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Childen Living at Home

Christina Newberry
Author, The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home

Adult Children in the News

AdultChildrenLivingatHome.com has been featured in a  number of news stories lately — further evidence that multi-generational living is a growing trend. You can find information about all of my work with the media on the Media page, but here are my three favorite recent articles:

Rules for When the Chicks Return to the Nest
By Alina Tugend, The New York Times

When Adult Kids Move Back Home: 8 rules to preserve your health, savings and peace of mind
by Stacy Julien, AARP

Being grown up about moving back home
by Andrea Pyros, The Vancouver Province

 


Watch Generation Boomerang online

If you missed Generation Boomerang last night on CBC, you can watch it online at http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/Shows/Doc_Zone/1242299559/ID=2166409510.

You can also read the transcript of an interesting live chat with the producers of the documentary from earlier this morning at http://opinion.financialpost.com/2011/11/09/generation-boomerang-join-our-live-chat-friday/

Some good insight and interesting things for parents to think about!

Generation Boomerang airs tonight on CBC

If you have adult children living at home and you’re living in Canada, you’ll want to check out Generation Boomerang tonight at 9 p.m. on CBC’s Doc Zone. You can find loads of information about the program at http://www.cbc.ca/doczone/episode/generation-boomerang.html

I spent a day talking with filmmakers Sharon Bartlett and Maria LeRose  of DreamFilm Productions about this increasing trend, and you can see parts of our discussion in the documentary. Here are some images from my day filming with the DreamFilm crew:


adult children living at home documentary filming
adult children living at home documentary filming
adult children living at home documentary filming