Category Archives: Media appearances

Preparing for adult kids moving home after college

I spoke with AARP recently about how to prepare for adult children boomeranging home after college — something I did myself 17 years ago. (Still think this is a new or temporary trend?)

Here’s the key point, which I can’t emphasize enough:

The end goal, Newberry says, is not to kick them out as soon as possible but to “help them get to the point where they are ready to leave.”

You can read the rest of the article on the AARP’s website, or check out the video below for five key strategies to make the situation work. I recorded this video way back in 2009, so the audio is not the best, but it’s worth bearing with it for the important information.

The Bank of Mom and Dad

globalI spoke with Global BC reporter Rumina Daya today about a new CIBC report that shows one in four parents are spending more than $500 a month to help their adult children cover expenses such as rent, groceries and cell phone bills, and that the most common form of financial support parents provide for their adult kids is free room and board at home (71 per cent). You can see Rumina’s story on Global’s website here.

 

How to handle the finances of a child who moves back home

That’s the topic addressed by an article in the Deseret News that features my advice:

Even a modest amount of cash paid to parents every month carries a benefit beyond the merely financial, Newberry added.

“Adults have financial responsibilities, so it’s important to maintain them even if your child is living at home,” she said. “It’s good for their self-esteem.”

Read the rest at DeseretNews.com

What if the adult kids never leave?

That’s the question posed by a Globe and Mail article published yesterday that features my advice for parents whose retirement is being threatened by adult children living at home:

“A family needs to sit down ahead of time and work out a budget … look at what their existing costs are in terms of paying for their home and things like heat, electricity, insurance and food, then estimate how those costs will be impacted by having another person living at home.

“It’s easy for adult children to go in expecting that it’s not going to cost anything or to be completely unaware of what the costs are.”

Read the rest of the article on the Globe and Mail’s website.

Setting rules for boomerang kids: Sun News Network

Today, Sun News Network has published an in-depth article on how to prepare for boomerang kids to come home, based on my advice:

“There’s a fine line between helping and helping too much, at which point it becomes very easy for your adult child to become dependent on you and not develop the skills they need to become independent,” Christina Newberry of Vancouver says. She’s the founder of AdultChildrenLivingatHome.com and author of The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home.

She offers these tips…

You can read the rest at Sun News Network.

My advice featured on Forbes.com

From “The Kids Move Back In: Secrets to Saving Your Sanity (Hint: Cash)” by Vanessa McGrady:

“The short answer is that there is no one approach that works for every family. That said, I do think it’s important for all adult children to make a regular financial contribution to the household , for a couple of reasons,” said Christina Newberry, an expert on adult children living at home. “First, it acknowledges that the parent is taking on extra costs to have them there. Second, it keeps the adult child in the mindset of having a monthly financial responsibility, which is how things will be once the adult child is out on their own. And third, it’s actually good for the adult child’s self-esteem when they feel like a contributing member of the household.”

Read the rest at Forbes.com

My interview with Bill Good on CKNW 980

It was an honour this morning to visit the studios of CKNW 980 for a one-on-one interview with one of BC’s most respected broadcasters, Bill Good. We had a great talk about how families should prepare when adult children move back home, and we took a few calls from families dealing with this situation — including one father who said his wife has delayed retirement so they can keep paying their adult children’s rent. Yikes! If you missed the interview, click below to listen online to my interview with Bill Good on adult children living at home.

Finding jobs on Kijiji and living with parents: An article on Yahoo.ca

I was quoted Friday in an article about adult children living at home for Yahoo.ca:

“The relationship between parents and their children has really changed over the last generation. Where parents are now seen much less as disciplinarian figures,” says Christina Newberry, author of The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home. “Parents are seen more as peers so the idea of going back and living with your parents is not so bad.”

Read the rest at Yahoo.ca.

Who should pay for college tuition?

My advice was featured today in an article by allParenting:

Christina Newberry is the author of The Hands-On Guide to Surviving Adult Children Living at Home and founder of the site Adult Children Living at Home. She says, “I paid my own college tuition through scholarships and part-time jobs and my parents took care of most of my housing expenses for the first two years. While what I did would likely not be possible with current tuition rates, I am a firm believer that it’s a good idea for kids to have a financial stake in their college education by paying at least some of their own 
tuition. Having some ‘skin in the 
game’ helps them take their years at school more seriously and feel a
 sense of ownership for their education. Similarly, if students are living 
with their parents to save money while attending school, I recommend they
 pay some kind of rent — even if it’s only a token amount or if the payment comes in the form of doing extra chores around the house. This all helps with the 
transition from childhood to adulthood and starts to create realistic 
expectations about what’s required to survive in the real world.”

Read the rest of the story at allParenting.com